Open Access

microRNAs: fine tuning of erythropoiesis

  • Marcin A. Listowski1,
  • Elżbieta Heger1,
  • Dżamila M. Bogusławska1,
  • Beata Machnicka1,
  • Kazimierz Kuliczkowski2,
  • Jacek Leluk1 and
  • Aleksander F. Sikorski1, 3Email author
Cellular & Molecular Biology LettersAn International Journal201218:38

https://doi.org/10.2478/s11658-012-0038-z

Received: 29 August 2012

Accepted: 24 October 2012

Published: 3 November 2012

Abstract

Cell proliferation and differentiation is a complex process involving many cellular mechanisms. One of the best-studied phenomena in cell differentiation is erythrocyte development during hematopoiesis in vertebrates. In recent years, a new class of small, endogenous, non-coding RNAs called microRNAs (miRNAs) emerged as important regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Thousands of miRNAs have been identified in various organisms, including protozoa, fungi, bacteria and viruses, proving that the regulatory miRNA pathway is conserved in evolution. There are many examples of miRNA-mediated regulation of gene expression in the processes of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, and in cancer genesis. Many of the collected data clearly show the dependence of the proteome of a cell on the qualitative and quantitative composition of endogenous miRNAs. Numerous specific miRNAs are present in the hematopoietic erythroid line. This review attempts to summarize the state of knowledge on the role of miRNAs in the regulation of different stages of erythropoiesis. Original experimental data and results obtained with bioinformatics tools were combined to elucidate the currently known regulatory network of miRNAs that guide the process of differentiation of red blood cells.

Key words

Hematopoiesis Erythrocyte Erythroid differentiation Erythropoiesis microRNA (miRNA) microRNA expression

Notes

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